waif

IPA: wˈeɪf

noun

  • (Britain, law, archaic) Often in the form waif and stray, waifs and strays: an article of movable property found of which the owner is not known, such as goods washed up on a beach or thrown away by an absconding thief; such items belong to the Crown, which may grant the right of ownership to them to a lord of a manor.
  • (figuratively)
  • Something found, especially if without an owner; something which comes along, as it were, by chance.
  • A person (especially a child) who is homeless and without means of support; also, a person excluded from society; an outcast.
  • (by extension) A very thin person.
  • (by extension, botany) A plant introduced in a place outside its native range but not persistently naturalized.
  • (nautical, chiefly whaling, historical) A small flag used as a signal.
  • Something (such as clouds or smoke) carried aloft by the wind.
  • (informal, derogatory) A minor celebrity who does not deserve his or her fame.

verb

  • (transitive) To cast aside or reject, and thus make a waif.

Examples of "waif" in Sentences

  • She wants to be a waif.
  • He feels bad about the waif.
  • Why do girls want to be a waif
  • Waifs are usually weaker than others.
  • A waif wants to be fat like his brother.
  • A waif notices her and thinks she is a real fairy.
  • What a poor pale sickly little waif the elder one is.
  • A waif usually refers to an orphan or a homeless young person.
  • I will tell you when your size zero waif has regained normal proportions.
  • Plus, if she's a waif, wouldn't she be smaller than the measurements supplied
  • "I hate to use the word waif, but what else can you call all these skinny young hairless guys?"
  • Perhaps some of them thought they befriended me for charity's sake, because I was a starved waif from the slums.
  • Learn more about the word "waif" and see usage examples across a range of subjects on the Vocabulary.com dictionary.
  • If a waif is a lost wanderer, then little Poosk was a decided waif for he had gone very much astray indeed in the North American backwoods.
  • The word waif has appeared in 19 New York Times articles in the past year, including this week in Monday's editions in "From Boys to Men," by Guy Trebay:
  • I grew an inch taller and broader between the corner of Cedar Street and Mr. Tetlow's house, such was the charm of the clean, green suburb on a cramped waif from the slums.
  • But quick-witted Mrs. Holmes guessed the word had been "waif" -- poor little waif, and she began dimly to comprehend the big-hearted, rough tent-man, who had tried to guard this little foreign maid from the ignorance and evil about her.
  • He liked his little protege ever since that unfortunate child -- a waif from a Chinese wash-house -- was impounded by some indignant miners for bringing home a highly imperfect and insufficient washing, and kept as hostage for a more proper return of the garments.
  • The waif is a pennoned pole, two or three of which are carried by every boat; and when additional game is at hand, are inserted upright into the floating body of a dead whale, both to mark its place on the sea, and also as token of prior possession, should the boats of any other ship draw near.
  • The waif is a pennoned pole, two or three of which are carried by every boat; and which, when additional game is at hand, are inserted upright into the floating body of a dead whale, both to mark its place on the sea, and also as token of prior possession, should the boats of any other ship draw near.

Related Links

syllables in waifsynonyms for waifdescribing words for waifunscramble waif

Workbooks

Advertisement
Advertisement
#AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz

© 2024 Copyright: WordPapa