d-day

IPA: dˈideɪ

Root Word: D-Day

noun

  • (historical) 6 June 1944, the date when the Allies invaded western Europe in World War II.
  • (figuratively, chiefly military) The date of any major event planned for the future.
  • Alternative letter-case form of D-Day [(historical) 6 June 1944, the date when the Allies invaded western Europe in World War II.]

Examples of "d-day" in Sentences

  • Okay, so everyone knew d-day parties were open to all.
  • Listed below are links to weblogs that reference d-day:
  • Two weeks after d-day we were the first fighter squadron on a strip that was there.
  • I remember feeling pride and sadness as I saw the bodies, 4,000 killed in two hours on d-day.
  • You'd have to wait for that to grow out so if you're sentenced to the guillotine, you can be certain you'll look your very best on d-day.
  • And we witnessed the invasion from the inside seat and I remember feeling pride and sadness as they saw the bodies, 4,000 killed in two hours on d-day.
  • Two weeks after d-day, we were the fighter squadron on a strip that was built there after a bad day attack on this German (INAUDIBLE) seeing innocent civilians massacred.
  • Two weeks after d-day, we were the fighter squadron on a strip that was built there after a bad day attack on this German Panzer division, seeing innocent civilians massacred.

Examples of "dday" in Sentences

    Related Links

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