hackney

IPA: hˈækni

Root Word: Hackney

noun

  • A London borough in Greater London, England, where once upon a time many horses were pastured.
  • A town in eastern London, England, within this borough (OS grid ref TQ3584).
  • An English habitational surname from Old English.
  • One of several breeds of compact English horses: see hackney
  • (in compounds) (means of transportation): see hackney.
  • (archaic) An ordinary horse.
  • A carriage for hire or a cab.
  • A horse used to ride or drive.
  • A breed of English horse.
  • (archaic) A hired drudge; a hireling; a prostitute.
  • (archaic, uncountable) Inferior writing; literary hackwork.

verb

  • (transitive) To make uninteresting or trite by frequent use.
  • (transitive) To use as a hackney.
  • (transitive) To carry in a hackney coach.

adjective

  • Offered for hire.
  • (figuratively) Much used; trite; mean.

Examples of "hackney" in Sentences

  • I bought a hackney.
  • The story is hackneyed.
  • I was kicked by the hackney.
  • She loves to ride a hackney.
  • The hackney was her best friend.
  • I feel a hackneyed phrase coming on.
  • The hackney was so expensive, but worth it.
  • It's far too colloquial, hackneyed and uninteresting.
  • It is far too colloquial, hackneyed and uninteresting.
  • “And here is my carriage,” he added, calling a hackney cab.
  • A spokesman said the licensing of private hire and hackney carriages was taken seriously.
  • Some people want a discreet vehicle to turn up for them, that's why they don't call a hackney carriage.
  • Mr Singleton proposed calling a hackney coach, she consented, and they stopt for it at the church porch.
  • When she went away, I called a hackney-coach for her, and getting behind it, went home with her to her lodgings.
  • Then they called a hackney-coach, which conveyed them to an inn, where they were furnished with a chariot and six, in which they set forward for
  • I was not content to let him go: But presently we called a hackney-coach, and myself and him, and major Tasker went, and carried that money to Mr. Tryon.
  • To that end I called a hackney-coach, not greatly caring, I confess it, to be seen in broad daylight in London streets with such an astonishing pair of guys as poor old Ruffiano and his friend.
  • When those involved were expelled after a huge public row over all sorts of things to do with how the party in hackney was run (at the time the press described the expellees as the good guys - they weren't) then it became the party they joined (ie the Lib Dems) who took it up.
  • Sir Roger told me further, that he looked upon it to be very good for a man whilst he stayed in town, to keep off infection, and that he got together a quantity of it upon the first news of the sickness being at Dantzick: when of a sudden, turning short to one of his servants who stood behind him, he bid him call a hackney-coach, and take care it was an elderly man that drove it.
  • Sir ROGER told me further, that he looked upon it to be very good for a man whilst he staid in town, to keep off infection, and that he got together a quantity of it upon the first news of the sickness being at _Dantzick_: When of a sudden, turning short to one of his servants who stood behind him, he bid him call a hackney-coach, and take care it was an elderly man that drove it.

Related Links

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